New Year, New Look

Hi Everybody

Another look at our blog, made us think: Why do we still look so 90's?
This is when we decided to do some cosmetic and functional changes:
We changed the theme (We though about buying a wordpress theme, but for some reason, they're way too expensive),
We installed a new commend system called "Disqus"
We have a new logo,
And we generally want to make your stay more comfortable.
We hope you like it.

HAPPY NEW YEAR

Roy and Arnon

Share

Push a file to your Smartphone

This is a quick tip. If you need to push a notification to your smartphone, or even send a file, I recently stumbled upon "Pushbullet".
I was looking for a solution to send a file (with automatic download) to my phone, via bash script on my raspberry pi. I've been using pushover for a while, but as far as I know, it doesn't support files

I have read the Pushbullet API, and came to realise that sending a file have 3 steps

1. Getting credentials to send the file
2. Upload the file to a remote server
3. Send a notification of "file" type with the download url

Of course, you can do 1 and 2 youself if you have access to a place which stores the file (I also managed to send a dropbox download link)

You need to sign up for Pushbullet via web, to get the api key, and also install the app on your smartphone (obviously)

So here is the bash script (It's not elegant - but it works)
Continue reading "Push a file to your Smartphone"

Share

Share NFS from Windows

I recently bought a second raspberry pi, for the purpose of making it a "dumb" media center running XBMC (Raspbmc to be exact). I already have a media center PC running XBMC on Windows 7, and I wanted to connect my raspberry pi to the downloaded media, stored remotely on the Win7.

First, of course, I tried SMB (windows share). It worked… ok. But after installing a new HP Wireless printer, it seemed to disconnect a lot. I don't fully understand why, but it appears that the printer publishes itself as SMB master thus disconnecting my other SMB connections (or maybe only Linux ones)

Anyways, I have spent almost two days, understanding how to connect the Raspberry pi to Windows 7 using NFS. It was not easy, because it seems Microsoft has dropped support for it on home OS (even Win7 ultimate) since Windows XP.

I ended up doing it with Cygwin (which gives powerful Linux capabilities to windows machines).

I want to outline what I have done in order for this to work. This process could be very easy and it could be frustrating. I really hope it will help you do it yourself.

So it might do the trick as step-by-step, and you might come some obstacles on the way

The original guide I used can be found in this link, however it did not work at once and I had to tweak a bit. Also, it is referring to Windows XP.

As this is not step-by-step in full, with screenshots, it might help you on your journey. This can also help you with any windows share to be exported to linux

Here it is: Continue reading "Share NFS from Windows"

Share

Trying out my mashup skills

This is not proper technical thingy, but I took some time to try out some audio skills by doing somewhat obvious mashup
Came out pretty good, in my opinion

Sara Baraeilles's "Brave" and Katy Perry's "Roar" sound very similar. So I took two acapellas and instrumental and mixed them together.

Enjoy (or.. not)

Share

Tailing the output of multiple files in Linux

This is a quick post to show a trick to tail multiple files, while showing the filename in the beginning of the line

What I needed was a way to grep multiple logs for an exception. But doing "tail -f *.log | grep exception" only let me see the exception, but I didn't know which log file to look in

I have found this guide, and altered the script and added

  1. Printing the file name in the beginning of each line
  2. Padding spaces after the file name (you can alter the minimal length in the ALIGN variable

Anyway - here's the script. Hope you find it useful

#!/bin/bash
 
# When this exits, exit all back ground process also.
trap 'kill $(jobs -p)' EXIT
 
ALIGN=31
 
# iterate through the each given file names,
for file in "$@"
do
        LENGTH=<code>echo ${file} | wc -c</code>
        PADDING=<code>expr ${ALIGN} - ${LENGTH}</code>
        PAD=<code>perl -e &quot;print ' ' x $PADDING;&quot;</code>
 
        # show tails of each in background.
        tail -f $file | sed &quot;s/^/${file}${PAD}:/g&quot;  &amp;
done
 
# wait .. until CTRL+C
wait
Share

A Creative way to bypass Pattern lock on Android

Let me start putting everything on the table – this post will describe how I eventually managed to unlock an unrooted, non-Google account linked Samsung Galaxy Mini Plus (GT-5570I) device without ADB support. There are a lot of guides on how to bypass this pattern lock on Android (and I will provide some links), but the purpose of this post is to show how looking for creative ways to do this can come handy

So a friend gave me a locked device. This device had no Google account linked to it (which prevented me from bypassing the lock with that account), there was no root or ADB access via recovery, and the USB debugging option was disabled.

I found this guide here, which states some commands you can type in ADB shell and should deactivate the pattern lock. So – How do I get ADB access on that phone? Continue reading "A Creative way to bypass Pattern lock on Android"

Share

Using your Raspberry Pi as an SSL Proxy

Not long ago, I have purchased an IP camera for my home. A nice toy I must say. I wanted to expose this camera for outside access. The issue is that this camera's interface does not support SSL.

Well because privacy is involved, the least I could do is add SSL somehow. I googled a bit and came across this article. I decided to use my raspberry pi for that.

The process itself is relatively easy but I had to do some improvisations over the article above. So I decided to make a tutorial for this.

You can use this to add SSL layer on top of every http you have.

So here we go: Continue reading "Using your Raspberry Pi as an SSL Proxy"

Share

Changing our host

Hi Guys,
We are currently switching hosts which should lead to a faster website experience.
During this process, our emails might not be available for a while.

Have a great week
Arnon & Roy

Share

The Raspberry Pi is Here

A few months back I placed an order for a raspberry pi. For those who don't know what it is, it is a really cool project which is basically a computer for 35$ (Shipping for me almost doubled it, but that's to be expected). It is a board, which as 256MB Ram, SD-Card slot, 2 USB Slots, an RCA Slot for analog video, and a headphone jack for analog audio.

It is originally a project for schools, to help today's kids get started with (python, but not only) programming.

To be exact with what the project guys are describing it:

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer board that plugs into a TV and a keyboard. It's a miniature ARM-based PC which can be used for many of the things that a desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing and games. It also plays High-Definition video.
Here are some FAQs

The OS of this board is stored on an SD Card. I have bought a class 10 16gb SD Card off of eBay for this purpose.

So few days ago, the board arrived! I finally found myself playing with it, and it's so much fun

Here are some common suggestions for usages: Continue reading "The Raspberry Pi is Here"

Share