WTH OpenGL 4? Rendering elements arrays with VAOs and VBOs in a QGLWidget

I spent an entire day getting OpenGL 4 to display data from a VAO with VBOs so I thought I'd share the results with you guys, save you some pain.

I'm using the excellent GL wrappers from Qt, and in particular QGLShaderProgram.
This is pretty straightforward, but the thing to remember is that OpenGL is looking for the vertices/other elements (color? tex coords?) to come from some bound GL buffer or from the host. So if your app is not working and nothing appears on screen, just make sure GL has a bound buffer and the shader locations match up and consistent (see the const int I have on the class here).

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Vertex array objects with shaders on OpenGL 2.1 & GLSL 1.2 [w/code]

rect3826Phew. Finally this is working!

I've been confined to OpenGL 2.1 and GLSL 1.2 on the Mac since the Qt OpenGL context will not pick up the core OpenGL profile (a big problem on it's own) and get an OpenGL 3.x and GLSL 1.5... So it's back to old school GL'ing, but anyway some things are working, albeit they have their quirks.
So for all of you battling the OpenGL 2.1 war, here's how I made VAOs work with a very simple shader.
Continue reading "Vertex array objects with shaders on OpenGL 2.1 & GLSL 1.2 [w/code]"

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How I fell for QGLViewer for my Qt/OpenGL projects [w/ code]

While looking for a very simple way to start up an OpenGL visualizer for quick 3D hacks, I discovered an excellent library called libQGLViewer, and I want to quickly show how easy it is to setup a 3D environment with it. This library provides an easy to access and feature-rich QtWidget you can embed in your UIs or use stand-alone (this may sound like a marketing thing, but they are not paying me anything 🙂

This is based on the library's own examples at: http://www.libqglviewer.com/examples/index.html, and some of the examples that come with the library source itself.

Let's see how it's done
Continue reading "How I fell for QGLViewer for my Qt/OpenGL projects [w/ code]"

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Head Pose Estimation with OpenCV & OpenGL Revisited [w/ code]

So I was contacted earlier by someone asking about the Head Pose Estimation work I put up a while back. And I remembered that I needed to go back to that work and fix some things, so it was a great opportunity.
I ended up making it a bit nicer, and it's also a good chance for us to review some OpenCV-OpenGL interoperation stuff. Things like getting a projection matrix in OpenCV and translating it to an OpenGL ModelView matrix, are very handy.
Let's get down to the code.
Continue reading "Head Pose Estimation with OpenCV & OpenGL Revisited [w/ code]"

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Structure from Motion and 3D reconstruction on the easy in OpenCV 2.3+ [w/ code]

Hello
This time I'll discuss a basic implementation of a Structure from Motion method, following the steps Hartley and Zisserman show in "The Bible" book: "Multiple View Geometry". I will show how simply their linear method can be implemented in OpenCV.

I treat this as a kind of tutorial, or a toy example, of how to perform Structure from Motion in OpenCV.
See related posts on using Qt instead of FLTK, triangulation and decomposing the essential matrix.

Update 2017: For a more in-depth tutorial see the new Mastering OpenCV book, chapter 3. Also see a recent post on upgrading to OpenCV3.

Let's get down to business...
Continue reading "Structure from Motion and 3D reconstruction on the easy in OpenCV 2.3+ [w/ code]"

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Spherical harmonics face relighting using OpenCV, OpenGL [w/ code]

Hi!
I've been working on implementing a face image relighting algorithm using spherical harmonics, one of the most elegant methods I've seen lately.
I start up by aligning a face model with OpenGL to automatically get the canonical face normals, which brushed up my knowledge of GLSL. Then I continue to estimating real faces "spharmonics", and relighting.

Let's start!
Continue reading "Spherical harmonics face relighting using OpenCV, OpenGL [w/ code]"

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Identity Transfer in Photographs

Hi!

I would like to present something I have been working on recently, a work that immensely affect what I wrote in the blog in the past two years...

To use it:
Go on this page,
Watch the short instruction video,
download the application (MacOSX-Intel-x64 Win32)
and make yourself a model!
It takes just a couple of minutes and it's very simple...

This work is an academic research project, Please please, take the time to fill out the survey! It is very short..
The results of the survey (the survey alone, no photos of your work) will possibly be published in an academic paper.

Note: No information is sent anywhere in any way outside of your machine (you may even unplug the network). All results are saved locally on your computer, and no inputs are recorded or transmitted. The application contains no malware. The source is available here.

Note II: All stock photos of models used in the application are released under Creative Commons By-NC-SA 2.0 license. Creator: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kk/. If you wish to distribute your results, they should also be released under a CC-By-NC-SA 2.0 license.

Thank you!
Roy.

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